The Cove

Out Now On-Demand

Eco-documentary, from National Geographic photographer Louie Psihoyos and marine crusade Richard O'Barry, campaigning for the end to dolphin slaughter in Taiji, Japan.

In Taiji, dolphin's are captured for the world's dolphinariums. The grotesque by-product of this already questionable trade is that surplus dolphins are slaughtered and passed off as whale meat in the supermarkets of Japan. The film follows US conservation group Oceanic Preservation Society – equipped and financed to the tune of $5 million by Netscape founder Jim Clark – as it covertly penetrates the massive wall of security around the operation in order to capture the footage that should blow this operation out of the water. Former Flipper trainer Ric O'Barry, painfully aware of the role that TV series had in popularising performing dolphin shows, is an eloquent and moving exponent of dolphin rights and a clued-up commentator on the intransigence of the Japanese and the ineffectiveness of the International Whaling Commission. (Source: NZ International Film Festival)

Trailers

Awards

Academy Award winner for Best Documentary, 2010. Audience Award (Documentary), Sundance Film Festival 2009.

Directed by

Written by

Documentary

94mins

USA

Official Site

For anyone who liked the documentary-meets-heist style of Man on Wire – and I don’t know anyone who saw it that didn’t – this release is a must-watch. It combines the best of both those worlds, with the edge-of-your-seat intrigue of a thriller wrapped around an imperative environmental issue.

Much of the film's power derives from drawing back the curtain on an activity that is so strongly associated with fun, namely trained dolphins. Inquisitive minds could probably sense that there is a dark side behind the captivity, but it’s doubtful that anyone could comprehend the full horror of the practice before seeing this movie. It gets you squarely behind the ecological espionage agents from the get go and adds real emotional depth to a mission that is far more dangerous than expected.

For a while the film seems well-intentioned but formally flawed. The musical selections, especially tracks like Charlie Chaplin's Smile, seem on-the-nose and a tad manipulative, while the director himself is one of the interview subjects (a pet peeve of mine). But The Cove is gripping throughout and culminates in some of the most shocking imagery you will ever see on screen. Your jaw will drop and your stomach will turn. Never has an environmental message been hammered home in such vivid terms. Go see this.

Chicago Sun-Times (Roger Ebert)

press

There are many documentaries angry about the human destruction of the planetary peace. This is one of the very best -- a certain Oscar nominee.

Dominion Post (Graeme Tuckett)

press

Like Man on Wire in 2008, and Deep Blue Sea in 2007, The Cove is the documentary that deserves to break through in 2009.

Hollywood Reporter

press

Shot rivetingly by cinematographer Brooke Aitken, who combines digital, night-vision and thermal-imaging formats into a formidable package, the footage is edited tautly by Geoffrey Richman and enhanced measurably by J. Ralph's suspenseful score.

Los Angeles Times

press

A powerful and effective piece of advocacy filmmaking, but it's difficult to watch it without thinking of subtitles like "The Place Where Evil Dwells" or "The Little Town With the Really Big Secret." Which is no accident.

Lumiere Reader (Wellington)

press

With a spy-thriller intellect and activist spirit, The Cove is an utterly compelling exploration of the dolphin trade, and the efforts of one passionate individual to tear it down.

New York Times

press

Like the director's cover story, the movie is a Trojan horse: an exceptionally well-made documentary that unfolds like a spy thriller, complete with bugged hotel rooms, clandestine derring-do and mysterious men in gray flannel suits.

NZ Herald (Peter Calder)

press

A documentary dressed up as a knuckle-whitening thriller.

Otago Daily Times (Mark Orton)

press

The film-makers maintain a relentless pace, frequent confrontations with Japanese fisherman and caricature-like law enforcement notwithstanding. The Cove is outstanding film-making.

Variety (USA)

press

Eco-activist documentaries don't get much more compelling than The Cove, an impassioned piece of advocacy filmmaking that follows "Flipper" trainer-turned-marine crusader Richard O'Barry in his efforts to end dolphin slaughter in Taiji, Japan.

Civilised - I don't think so!

user


Civilised - I don't think so!

The Japanese pride themselves on being a civilised race - but these people from Taiji are barbarians, or worse!

May they all enjoy the Mercurial benefits of their nefarious trade.

THE COVE greenpeace and sea shepards newest ammo for getting your money

user


THE COVE greenpeace and sea shepards newest ammo for getting your money

as usual the eco terrorists jump on the band wagon and have a moan, this was a rubbish film only showing one side of the story which they broke laws to get. its amazing what people get away with just to tug at heart strings and get money


My review

Dolphin = fish, get over yourselves.

The Cove- must see

user


The Cove- must see

Anybody who cares about anything needs to see this movie, and sign the petition here: http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/724210624 , these guys did a great job at getting this secret out, and it is working.

i don't think many humans could sit back and ignore after watching this film.

THE COVE - SAVE DOLPHINS fundraisers

user


THE COVE - SAVE DOLPHINS fundraisers

Bring your dolphin and whale loving friends and join Pete Bethune from EarthRace and other celebrities on Sat 29 Aug 6pm book at THE ACADEMY or The Bridgeway Wed 2 Sep at 8:15pm book on 09 480 6440 info@seashepherd.org.nz

Love Dolphins? - Join us for The Cove Fundraising screenings

user


Love Dolphins? - Join us for The Cove Fundraising screenings

The Cove has all the suspense and thrill of a feature movie but the atmosphere of tension is genuine. The courage and skill of the team is no actor's portrayal -and the personal threat is very real; in facing these extreme circumstances, Director, Louie Psihoyos, original Flipper trainer, Ric O'Barry and crew acheive an accurate record of this shameful & horrendous crime against a super- intelligence -driven by the greed of a multi-million industry.

If you have even the slightest regard for dolphins please support this ! To join the fundraising screenings (proceeds to Sea Shepherd as active partner to Oceanic Preservation Society and take /part) Info@seashepherd.org.nz

DeeAnne

Sea Shepherd Conservation Society NZ

Dr DeeAnne Raymont

National Co-Ordinator

119 Hinemoa St

Birkenhead

Auckland 0626

New Zealand

Phone + 64 9 480 6440

Mobile 021 0565603

DEFEND CONSERVE PROTECT